But Mitski (she’s much more impressive than Sum 41, not sorry) has a voice and quality in her music that feels super cathartic — it’s like she’s reading from your diary and releasing your demons for you. She’s also Asian-American, and I grew up with zero Asian-American musicians to look up to.

There were virtually no costs for “Here It Goes Again,” and it makes an excellent inspirational showcase for how creativity can be utilized to great effect to execute something memorable.

Early in my career as an electric bassist, I was hired to play in a wedding band. Right off the bat, this meant adding thirty or so tunes from Billboard’s holy list to my existing repertoire in about three days’ time. That first gig went pretty well, and with a few hours of having new material under my belt, I figured I was through the thick of it… but no. The coming months saw a stream of strangers’ special days, each of which came with its very own, personalized collection of “Today’s Hits.” For a while there, I was learning tunes in real time (and thanks to some off-the-setlist song requests, there were definitely times when that was happening in a very literal sense). Unsurprisingly, the experience made my ear more accurate and even enhanced my melodic and harmonic vocabularies.

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Powered by data from the online streaming radio platform Pandora, Next Big Sound (NBS) is essentially a giant analytics-based service that gives artists access to everything they need to know to make informed decisions about their next digital move. They also help to bridge the gaps and patch the holes between artists and their fans.

These classic music videos feature thought-provoking concepts and communicate the message of their song perfectly, in ways that we can borrow ourselves.

Tredici Bacci’s latest record, La Fine Del Futuro, released this spring, makes me feel like I’m playing a minor character in a movie about falling in love on mushrooms in a European technicolor nightmare circus. And oh yes, it’s definitely set in the 1970s. Simon Hanes is this 13-piece soundtrack-pop ensemble’s fearless leader, as well as its composer and arranger. Flypaper’s Dre DiMura asked the California-raised Brooklyn-based musical polymath to speak about his sense of humor, which is integral to the music, and Hanes said something which I think encompasses a huge part of the ethos of this interview series:

With overwhelmingly positive results, we’re happy to share a few testimonials of Soundfly’s Orchestration For Strings course directly from our students.

Every week, whether on your phone call or in a subsequent email, you should expect in-depth feedback on the activities you’ve done to help guide you in the right direction and closer to your goal.

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When saving your projects, make sure that you label them clearly so you can recall their specificities. You can also use folders to organize different projects and versions of songs. Here’s an example of how I often label my tracking projects:

Unfortunately, it’s going to be pretty sour against the G string at 64/27 Hz. So maybe you should just tune the G string a major third below your new B, at 12/5 Hz. Now the G and B strings sound great together, but the G is out of tune against the D string at 16/9 Hz. So maybe D should be a fourth below G… but then the D string will be out of tune against A. If you tune the A based on your new D, then it’ll be out of tune against the low E. And if you tune the low E based on your new A, then it’ll be out of tune against the high E. There’s just no way to win.

One thing you might have noticed is that we haven’t seen a ton of instrumental music so far. As previously stated, it’s not always as easy to identify a verse and chorus in instrumental music, so thinking in terms of Section A and B can be more useful. But given that, there’s really no limit on what sort of structures you might see:

Soundfly welcomes new voices each month to offer unique perspectives, shine a light on unexpected musical worlds, and help our readers find their sound.

Here’s an interesting one. In 1983, Haruomi Hosono, a member of the famed Yellow Magic Orchestra with Ryuichi Sakamoto, and a well-known synthesist throughout the 1980s, was asked by the directors at MUJI to create “background music” for their newly opened stores. So, muzak. This blissful, sometimes atonal, wabi-sabi music has been described as “a playful, yet uneasy dream-space of aural fog.” It was released in a short run of cassettes and never heard about again… until now!