Ethan Hein is a Doctoral Fellow in Music Education at New York University. He teaches music technology, production and education at NYU and Montclair State University. With the NYU Music Experience Design Lab, Ethan has taken a leadership role in the creation of new technologies for learning and expression, most notably the Groove Pizza. He is the instructor of the free Soundfly course series called Theory for Producers. He maintains a widely-followed and influential blog, and has written for various publications, including Slate, Quartz, and NewMusicBox.

This is why we’ve set out to create an online education experience that is more personalized and focused around the student; it’s why we’re always searching for the best producers, composers, songwriters, beat makers, and music business experts to bring into our Soundfly Mentor community; and it’s why we’re constantly tracking down the most helpful resources available to help you grow and improve.

In the Presence of Wolves wants to record their sophomore album, stay the course, inch towards fame one step at a time, and do it with a smile. Okay, maybe a smirk. These guys are goofballs, and they’re able to convey their true personalities along with their struggles (“Dude, we play prog-metal, we don’t have any girls at our shows”) in their well-crafted pitch video.

Music technology grants

Check out Soundfly’s array of free online courses like Touring on a Shoestring, Building a Better Band, and Live Clicks and Backing Tracks, all designed to help you up your efficiency, make more money, and get on the road quicker. And check out the Headliners Club program for 1-on-1 goal-oriented pro mentorship today to work with a coach on realizing your musical goals. 

“Thank you for what has been one of the best musical learning experiences I’ve ever had. With Ian as a mentor, I’ve grown beyond anything I thought possible in six weeks.

We love psychologist Anders Ericsson’s concept of “deliberate practice.” It describes an approach to learning in which we focus our activities on the areas that need the most work, steadily pushing ourselves to the edge of our comfort zone (you can read more about the science behind this method here). As learners, this kind of work can be tough to do because we often don’t know what we need to do next to improve.

Soundfly started scraping our own free course, Crowdfunding for Musicians, of as many mentions of PledgeMusic as possible. We were beginning to think the incredibly hopeful era of crowdfunding and its implied economic utopia — fans funding artists directly and becoming stakeholders in their success — was coming to an end. But then we heard the good news.

I started to experiment with some of the horn samples in the pack and, though I didn’t end up using any, they gave me the idea to feature a trumpet player. I immediately thought of my friend and frequent collaborator, Jake Baldwin. I met Jake in Boston in 2010 while I was at Berklee and he was down the street studying at NEC. We started making music together right away in our New York-based hip-hop collective, Tiger Speak, but in recent years, we’ve both relocated to other cities.

New hip hop artists 2019

So today, on World Television Day ’17, we’d like to commemorate 17 of the greatest moments in American-music-television history. Follow us chronologically as we explore the last 50-plus years and rehash some of the best, most awkward, and memorable times music stole the small screen and our hearts in the process.

For this course, you really just need to know enough about mixing that you know you need to learn more. If you’ve ever struggled to communicate with a mix engineer in order to get the sound you’re looking for, or listened to your own tracks and been unable to pinpoint exactly what you need to do to improve your sound, this is the course for you.

What’s the one thing (or three or four!) that you do that nobody else does? Describe your band, give a brief history about your work, and highlight your accomplishments. If you don’t have any successes yet, then your goal should be to get your foot in the door of a small local venue, or play in your friends’ living rooms and backyards and set up cameras to capture the show, or do whatever you can to get out there on the circuit. Then build momentum from there.

This is an absolutely insanely great playlist of New Mexico-based chiptune hero Bud Melvin covering selections by the Cure for a recent Halloween set. If you’re interested in hearing some goth, new wave, chiptune augmented with banjo, awesome wacky vocals, and country influences, look no further.

Another extremely common and timeless technique to make your chorus shine is simply cutting the music out completely for half a measure or even an entire measure in some cases. Some of today’s electronic producers also prefer cutting out effects such as reverb and delay, to make that moment of silence even more dramatic, like you’re falling off a tiny cliff. This technique is especially fun to apply in situations where the chorus vocals start with pick-up notes from the previous measure.